Creative Review Gradwatch 2017

I am so grateful that Creative Review spotted my work at the Degree Show this year. They kindly gave me a feature on their website and Instagram page.

If you have the time check it out and have a look at what else they were inspired by. 

https://www.creativereview.co.uk/gradwatch-highlights-lcc-design-degree-show/

Extremes and In-betweens: Ed Ruscha Exhibition

I have always wanted to see Ed Ruscha’s work in person and was very excited to go to his exhibition in London.

Extremes and In-betweens took place at Gagosian, a very modern exhibition space located near Bond Street Station. Sometimes I find modern spaces to be quite plain and boring because of the white walls, however, Ed Ruscha’s art work was on a larger scale so the rooms did not seem empty. The design of the rooms were very contemporary but nice and I was very fond of the windows because they were big enough to bring in enough natural lighting, as well as having a lovely view of the streets.

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All the painting differ from one another but still have a link. His four images at the entrance were unique, as they showed tops of mountains framed by a darkened cinematic aperture along with language like ‘All Some None’.

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My favourite piece from the exhibition was Bio, Biology, 2016. The texture made me want to touch the canvas and the composition within the text was so poetic. The stages of spelling and saying the word ‘biology’ was shown perfectly because of the size and gradually adding letters. The circular shapes behind each text reflects science and I felt it stood out from the rest of his work.

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One aspect that was needed was a little description of each artwork, as I do like to find out more about how it was made and the reason behind it. Nevertheless, I thought the exhibition was great.

I am inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work because I am looking at image and text. My recent work, I decided to experiment with adding text on my images. But the point of this was to make the text just as important as the image behind it. In Ruschca’s work, the language becomes an object itself.